As each week brings us more cases of the novel coronavirus referred to as COVID-19 and more mandated restrictions from the government to slow the spread and flatten the curve of the pandemic, we also are seeing more and more examples of the strength of our community and those seeking to help.

Over the course of just a few short weeks, the coronavirus has twisted its tendrils into the fabric of our daily lives. Due to the threat of the pandemic in Maryland — and now, its aggressive arrival — it controls commerce, social interaction and most everything else.

The United States Constitution was ratified on June 21, 1788. It was not until Aug. 18, 1920 — more than 132 years and 18 amendments later — that the 19th Amendment giving women the right to vote was ratified, having been approved by Congress the year before.

On the evening of March 2, the Chestertown Mayor and Council are going to open their regularly scheduled meeting to a discussion on racial incidents that have been occurring at Washington College, as students have been threatened and harassed by local teens.

While the new deadly strain of coronavirus is getting the top health headlines this winter, we all need to remember that we are still in peak flu season, which can be just as dangerous.

Maybe you’ve seen those Ancestry.com commercials pushing Americans to “discover their stories” by digging into their family histories.

The landscape continues to pose challenges for community newspapers. While the Kent County News continues to remain strong thanks to our dedicated readers and advertisers, the journalism community in Maryland took a hit recently with the closing of two local papers serving western shore readers.

This January marks the 19th annual National Mentoring Month, a campaign aimed at connecting young people with caring adults.

As we celebrate the legacy of Martin Luther King Jr., it’s natural to remember his courageous advocacy for racial equity. But before he was assassinated, King had also begun to broaden his efforts to unify the around economic justice.

“Like anybody, I would like to live — a long life; longevity has its place. But I’m not concerned about that now. I just want to do God’s will. And He’s allowed me to go up to the mountain. And I’ve looked over. And I’ve seen the Promised Land. I may not get there with you. But I want you to…

A significant museum in Washington, D.C. closed its doors at the end of the year, marking a loss in the promotion of the freedom of the press and a source of inspiration for those interested in joining the journalistic ranks.

For those still working on their final new year’s resolution, there are no shortage of ideas floating around the internet. Let’s be honest, every editorialist and columnist pretty much knows that the last issue of the year — or the first — demands the annual piece on new year’s resolutions. …

Hopefully this week’s issue finds you at a time of peace and contentment. Our cover date is Thursday, Dec. 26, so all the hustle and bustle of the days before Christmas should now have given way to a nice relaxing break.

As President Donald Trump’s impeachment unspools, news coverage is buzzing about conspiracy theories and geopolitical rivalries. But at the root of Trump’s effort to extort Ukraine was a simple motive: Trump hoped to influence our elections to preserve his power and that of his associates.

Gravity on Earth measures out to a rate of acceleration that equals about 9.8 meters per second squared. Jupiter’s gravity is 24.79 meters per second squared, meaning a 200-pound human on Earth weighs 480 pounds on Jupiter.

Heating, holiday decorations, winter storms and candles all contribute to an increased risk of fire during the winter months.

Not to share industry secrets, but normally these editorials are written by Daniel Divilio — editor of the Kent County News. Today’s voice behind the curtain is coming from me, Lifestyle Editor Leann Schenke. The reason for this exposition, and turning this editorial into a column, is becaus…

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