CHESTERTOWN — Ever wondered what life was like for soldiers and civilians during the American Revolution? Ever had the urge to try your hand at blacksmithing, tin work, wood crafting or firing flintlock muskets?

If so, Washington College has an experience for you.

Participants will spend nine days in Williamsburg, Va. the world’s premier open-air living history museum, interacting with expert craftsmen and historians, according to a news release.

Using experimental archaeology and period technical skills, participants will go behind the scenes and work with internationally recognized curators, skilled tradesmen and specialists in the study and use of a wide range of 18th century domestic and military material culture.

Participants will make items in the various trade shops and then have a chance to put them to use in the field at the end of the week.

This opportunity is part of a semester-long course offered at Washington College. Due to popular demand, the experiential portion of this course will be opened to non-students for the very first time.

Space is limited. There are only seven spots available to the public.

The fee for this program is $1,875, with a $500 non-refundable deposit due no later than Jan. 20.

The fee includes facilities pass, hotel room (double occupancy – singles available at additional cost), all meals and course-related expenses for the week in Colonial Williamsburg.

For more information, contact professor John Seidel at 410-708-5094 or jseidel2@washcoll.edu or Chuck Fithian at 302-222-0863 or cfithian2@washcoll.edu.

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