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Youthful muskrat champ crowned

CAMBRIDGE — A young champion was crowned Saturday in Cambridge at the 11th annual Crawfish Boil and Muskrat Stew Fest.

Daniel “Chunky” Hesson, a 15-year-old eating in his second competition, won the intense muskrat leg competition, out-bone cleaning the competition.

Second place finisher and muskrat leg legend Ralph “Peg Leg” Bramble cleaned his plate of bones just minutes after he was made the inaugural member of the Muskrat Leg Eating Hall of Fame.

Coming in third was a newcomer from Talbot County, Dink Daffin.


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GOVERNMENT
Cambridge Council approves shot spotter to combat gun violence

CAMBRIDGE — Cambridge Police will be getting new technology to help prevent shootings and make more arrests of those engaging in gun violence. Cambridge Police Chief Mark Lewis was at Monday’s meeting with the City Council to talk about Shot Spotter, a new program that will be implemented in the city where many shootings have occurred.

“This is a national program used all over the country. The program takes an area of about a square mile and monitors it with sensors. When a gunshot goes off, police are notified in 35 to 40 seconds to the exact location that the gun shot came from,” Lewis said.

The Shot Spotter is very precise, according to Lewis.

“Baltimore City currently uses it to great success and the governor’s office thinks highly of it as well. The state is going to give us $35,000 to start us off with this program,” Lewis said.

The program will be tested over the next two years.

Council members also declared June to be Gun Violence Awareness month.

“This proclamation declares June to be National Gun Violence Awareness Month in the City of Cambridge to honor and remember all victims and survivors of gun violence and to declare that we as a city and a country must do more to reduce gun violence,” said Cambridge City Council President Lajan Cephas.

Maryland ranks 32 on the highest rate of gun homicides in the country. Community activists came to the meeting to speak to the council about what can be done about violence and unsafe areas in the city.

“I think that everyone had a similar agenda and that is that they want what’s best for the city. That includes what’s best for the youth, the police and the mayoral election,” said community activist Theresa Stafford.

Next, the issue of trash collection was addressed. Chesapeake Waste, the trash collection company for the city said they may have to raise rates if gas prices continue to climb. The council will be discussing the pros and cons of collecting trash in house to make a report of their findings by the May 23 council meeting. In the meantime, the contract with Chesapeake Waste will be extended to June 30 and possibly to the end of 2022.

Following that, the council discussed Cannery Way in the city and the Harriet Tubman Bureau Viewing Area Master Plan. The council heard progress reports on possibly constructing a replica of Harriet Tubman’s father Ben Ross’s cabin in the vicinity.

“We had a small meeting with the adjacent property owners to get feedback in regards to the project. We are going to be having another larger community meeting on May 11 at 5:30 p.m. at the mural site and we’re inviting everyone,” said Pat Escher, division manager of the planning and zoning department.

The original cabin is no longer standing, but a replica can be constructed with a historian providing oversight.

“The state is conducting archeological studies in the south of Dorchester County where they believe they have found remnants of Ben Ross’s cabin,” Escher said.

In addition to the historic excavations, a statue of Harriet Tubman with a beacon leading the way is being created for the city.

The inspirational statue of Harriet Tubman, called the “Beacon of Hope,” will go in front of the Dorchester County courthouse. It is expected to be unveiled on Saturday, Sept. 10.

Next, the city commissioners recognized May as Asian American, Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander Heritage Month, which has been a dedication going back to 1992. It recognizes the contributions in American history, society and culture by Asian Americans, Native Hawaiian people and Pacific Islanders.

“They have made significant contributions to the U.S. at all levels of government and in the United States Armed Forces, the arts, law, science, technology, sports and public service,” said Cephas.

The next city council meeting is scheduled for 6 p.m. Monday, May 23.


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Man arrested in Cambridge stabbing

CAMBRIDGE — Officers from the Cambridge Police Department arrested a man who admitted to stabbing another man Monday afternoon.

Just before 5:30 p.m. on Monday, May 9, CPD officers responded to the 600 block of Race Street in reference to a male subject who entered an establishment with a knife in his hand and said he had just stabbed someone.

Police located the subject, later identified as Alazar S. Getachew, 23, of Cambridge, behind a building in the 500 block of Race Street.

Getachew told police that he did just stab someone, and police located a knife on his person.

Police believe an argument took place between Getachew and the victim, but neither man was cooperative with giving exact details.

The victim was located nearby with a stab wound to his stomach. He was taken to the University of Maryland Shock Trauma Center in Baltimore for surgery. He is listed in stable condition, police said.

Getachew was arrested and charged with attempted second-degree murder, first- and second-degree assault, reckless endangerment and possession of a dangerous weapon with intent to injure.

Getachew was ordered held without bond in the Dorchester County Detention Center Monday.

According to online records, the court ordered a competency examination to determine if Getachew is fit to stand trial.

He is scheduled to appear in the county district court for a preliminary hearing on June 6.


A young artist focuses on her work during the “Chalk the Walk” event May 10 at Hurlock Elementary to mark May as Children’s Mental Health Awareness Month. See related story and photos, page 2.

A young artist focuses on her work


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